What Did Christ Accomplish?

From John Murray’s Redemption — Accomplished and Applied:

The very nature of Christ’s mission and accomplishment is involved in this question. Did Christ come to make the salvation of all men possible, to remove obstacles that stood in the way of salvation, and merely to make provision for salvation? Or did he come to save his people? Did he come to put all men in a salvable state? Or did he come to secure the salvation of all those who are ordained to eternal life? Did he come to make men redeemable? Or did he come effectually and infallibly to redeem?

4 comments on “What Did Christ Accomplish?

  1. Hey there,

    Why not both? Why could it not be that Christ made the salvation of all men legally possble, by removing the legal barriers which necessarily stood between God and all men, and also offer himself as a sacrifice of expiation with the intention to effectually save and redeem the elect?

    Thanks,
    David

  2. John Gardner says:

    If you’re a Calvinist, he did do both. The key word in the Murray quote is “merely”. Did Christ “merely” make salvation legally possible, or did he do everything required to accomplish salvation? It’s the question on which hinges the entire monergism/synergism debate. Both sides agree that Christ made salvation legally possible, but disagree on whether there is anything left for men to contribute toward the actual accomplishment of their own salvation.

  3. Hey there,

    Just to let you know, I posted a comment using open account but dont know if it got through to your moderate folder. I fear it may have fallen into the spam folder.

    Thanks,
    David

  4. Hey,

    It seems my earlier reply has been lost. I didn’t keep a copy, but essentially this part I do remember.
    The form of the argument is: A or B. Not A, therefore B.

    The problem is, disproving/rejecting A does not automatically prove B. The suggested limited atonement that ‘either Christ died simply to make all men savable, or to effectually save the elect’ is not a workable argument.

    Another option could be that he accomplished both the making of all men savable, and the salvation of the elect.

    Thanks for your time,
    David

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