Top Books of 2010

I read a LOT of books this year, so it’s hard to narrow down the best, but this is my attempt to do so. One of my reading goals for the year was to read more “old” books, so I’ve finally gotten around to a lot of Christian “classics” that have been gathering dust on my bookshelf and my Amazon wish list for years. With that in mind, here are my top dozen recommendations from my 2010 reading (I haven’t reviewed all of them yet, but will post links to those I have reviewed). Also, where possible, I’ve listed a couple different bookstores for each book so you can price-check if you’re interested in buying any of the books… which you should be! I hope that many of you will enjoy them as I have!

Redemption Accomplished and Applied, by John Murray

Difficult reading, but this book lived up to its reputation as the very best treatment of the doctrine of salvation ever written.

Read my review

Buy this book from:

Why Johnny Can’t Sing Hymns: How Pop Culture Rewrote the Hymnal, by T. David Gordon

I didn’t agree with everything Gordon wrote, but he really challenged my thinking on song selection and musical worship. That’s a good thing.

Read my review

Buy this book from:

Romans (St. Andrews Expository Commentary), by R.C. Sproul

I technically still have a few pages to go, but I’ve read enough of this to know it needs to go on this list. Sproul is such a great teacher, and Romans is right in his wheel-house. He knocks it out of the park!

Buy this book from:

Perelandra, by C.S. Lewis

I finally got around to reading Lewis’ Space Trilogy, the fiction series that preceded Narnia. The whole series is great, but this was my favorite of the three.

Read my review

Buy this book from:

Doctrine: What Christians Should Believe, by Mark Driscoll

Again, I haven’t quite finished it, so no review yet, but this is quite possibly the very best introductory systematic theology book ever written. It’s thorough and biblically-sound, yet accessible (and interesting) to readers at any level of doctrinal knowledge.

But this book from:

The Church and the Suprising Offense of God’s Love: Reintroducing the Doctrines of Church Membership and Discipline, by Jonathan Leeman

Admittedly a book with limited appeal, this is an excellent treatment of some difficult but essential doctrines which are very much lacking in many churches today.

Read my review

Buy this book from:

A Practical View of Christianity, by William Wilberforce

The magnum opus of one of my personal heroes, I could not believe how incredibly relevant this book is more than 200 years after it was written. My review should be posted soon.

Buy this book from:

What Is the Gospel?, by Greg Gilbert

A short but brilliant book that answers the most essential question any Christian could ask.

Read my review

Buy this book from:

Dug Down Deep: Unearthing What I Believe and Why It Matters, by Joshua Harris

If this book doesn’t make you want to study theology (and love it!), I don’t know what will. Okay, I do… the Holy Spirit will, but He just might use this book!

Read my review

Buy this book from:

Christianity and Liberalism, by J. Gresham Machen

Another “classic” that is possibly more relevant today than ever. Machen absolutely demolishes the position of the liberal theology that had invaded the church, and which is still very influential today.

Read my review

Buy this book from:

Radical: Taking Back Your Faith from the American Dream, by David Platt

While readers must caution themselves against over-reacting to this book feeling guilty over a lack of good works, this is one of the most challenging and timely books I’ve ever read. An absolute must-read.

Read my review

Buy this book from:

The Trellis and the Vine: The Ministry Mind-Shift That Changes Everything, by Collin Marshall and Tony Payne

For me, reading this book did change (nearly) everything about my approach to ministry and discipleship. Please read it!

Read my review

Buy this book from:

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s